21701 Lawson Road, Little Rock, Arkansas 72210 1-800-411-6146 1-501-821-4770

General Monthly Gardening Tips

 

January

  • Check out River Valley's Schedule for FREE Saturday Gardening Seminars on our facebook & our website.
  • Take time to prepare a plan for spring planting or visit River Valley and let one of our design experts do it for you!
  • Time to sow seeds indoors for warm-season annuals
  • Clean flower beds and destroy diseased leaves or branches to prevent disease in the garden.
  • Apply dormant spray to fruit trees before buds swell
  • Sow seeds for frost-tolerant perennials
  • Sow seeds for tender perennials

February

  • Save the date! Arkansas Flower & Garden Show this year March 2nd, 3rd, & 4th at the Arkansas State Fairgrounds! View details at www.arflowerandgardenshow.org
  • Check out River Valley's Schedule for FREE Saturday Gardening Seminars on our facebook & our website.
  • Sow seeds of warm-season annuals indoors
  • Sow seeds of warm-season vegetables indoors
  • Prepare garden beds with compost and organic fertilizers such as Lady bug Brand "John's Recipe".
  • Prune flowering fruit trees while in bloom
  • Prune winter-flowering shrubs and vines after bloom
  • Sow seeds for hardy spring-blooming annuals
  • Plant or transplant cool-season vegetable seedlings
  • Treat & fertilize your lawn with pre-emergent weed control or weed & feed for southern lawns at the end of the month
  • Don't forget your winter annuals! Violas & pansies are still pushing through and are they hungry! Treat them with BR-51 to ensure an extra punch of color & blooms throughout the spring season

March

  • See you at the Arkansas Flower & Garden Show! March 2nd, 3rd, & 4th! View details at www.arflowerandgardenshow.org 
  • Repot houseplants that are rootbound with a container at least 2" wider than its original pot
  • According to Farmer's Almanac, the last chance of frost is March 20th for the year 2018
  • Top-dress lawns with Milogranite 5-2-0
  • Remove weeds & dead foliage from garden beds
  • Ornamental grasses & evergreen groundcovers like Mondo & Liriope should be cut to the ground as soon as new growth appears for lush spring growth
  • Summer & Fall blooming perennials should be divided in Springtime
  • Set your mower on low to remove all old growth before new growth sets in
  • Time to stock-up and plant!! All balled-and-burlapped, container, shrubs, roses, and vines are ready!

April

  • Plant heat loving annuals 
  • Pull spring weeds before they go to seed!
  • Apply 2-3” of mulch for weed suppression.
  • Prune winter-flowering shrubs and vines after bloom
  • Plant or transplant warm-season annuals
  • Prune frost-sensitive fruit trees
  • Prune spring-flowering or tender shrubs and vines during or just after bloom
  • Plant warm season vegetable seedlings

May

  • Prune Encore Azaleas after the first spring bloom has finished.
  • Check all plants for insect and disease activity.
  • Plant annuals for summer and fall color
  • Prune spring-flowering or tender shrubs andvines during or just after bloom
  • Plant or transplant warm-season vegetable seedlings

June

  • Apply PlantSkydd animal repellant to keep gardens and ornamental plants safe.
  • Use Treegator slow release watering bags to give trees“deep root water”.
  • Try container gardening. Use a lightweight Crescent® planter to add color and interest to your landscape.
  • Remove spent flowers from spring annuals to stretch the blooming season
  • Plant fall-blooming perennials now
  • Trim back vines (spring-blooming clematis and wisteria) after they bloom
  • Begin feeding vegetable plants as they start to flower
  • Continue to spray peach and apple trees to control fungal diseases
  • Lightly prune tips of blackberries and pinch flowers off young grapevines to form and train growth of new canes
  • Sow seeds of heat-loving vegetables (squash, pumpkins, melons) directly into the ground
  • Continue to fertilize roses and treat with fungicide as needed

July

  • Plant pumpkin seeds from Botanical Interest for a Halloween harvest of your very own!
  • Water in the early morning deeply for best absorption and least evaporation, this encourages a deep root system..
  • Remove faded flowers from perennials after they finish blooming. Deadheading redirects energy towards healthy roots.
  • Maintain a 3 to 4 inch mulch layer around trees and shrubs to protect them from mower and weed whacker 'blight'.
  • Check plants regularly for insect problems; hand pick or use suitable control measures if found
  • Fertilize warm-season grasses
  • Plant butterfly nectar and larval food plants such as asclepias, buddleia, and passionflower
  • Replace spent annuals with heat-tolerant lantana, verbena, pentas, and hardy hibiscus
  • Consider drip irrigation and/or soaker hoses as efficient watering alternatives
  • Harvest raspberries and blackberries daily to avoid attracting insects to overripe fruit
  • Water flowerbeds and vegetable gardens deeply. This encourages a deep root system
  • Prune fruit trees, including apples, and ornamentals. Summer pruning helps keep trees smaller and easier to maintain. A few exceptions: don't cut your azaleas, hollies, camellias and other plants that flower in the fall or early spring or make berries in the fall -- you'll lop off their flowers and fruits; and don't prune dogwoods during the summer when borers (a moth larva) are present. If you spot an entrance hole, you can inject a squirt of B.T. or a thin wire to kill the caterpillar.
  • Watch out for fireblight in apples and pears; remove infected areas several inches into unaffected parts of the branch, and disinfect your shears with bleach or alcohol between cuts.
  • Prune crape myrtle blossoms after they fade to extend the flowering period.
  • Pinch back bedding plants to encourage bushiness. Give your mums a final good pinch, too.
  • Deadhead--remove spent blooms- on lilies, but leave the foliage -- summer bulbs need leaves to build up reserves, just like spring bulbs do. Keep after the mush mummies on your daylilies (Hemerocallis).
  • If you have a pest problem, be sure to identify the problem accurately before you begin treatment. Use the least toxic and most focused solution and keep in mind that all 'broad-spectrum' products, even organic ones, can harm beneficial organisms.
  • Pick off Japanese beetles early or late in the day when it is cool and they are a bit sluggish. You can control the grubs this coming fall by applying milky spore to your soil. This approach works best if your neighbors apply the spores as well.
  • Handpick bagworm bags on evergreens. Pesticides are worthless once the caterpillars are safe in their bags.

August

  • Watch for fungal activity in lawns and on plants.
  • Use Neem Oil to control fungus, insect, and disease problems.
  • Collect seeds from your wildflower gardens.
  • Sprinkle compost starter to speed up composting for fall soil building
  • Prune summer-blooming shrubs (hydrangea, clethra, caryopteris) after flowers finish
  • Sow seeds of cool-weather herbs (chives, parsley, garlic chives, cilantro and dill)
  • Keep cool during summer's dog days with a shade garden embroidered with hostas and hardy ferns

September

  • Start a compost bin!
  • Plant or repair lawns
  • Plant ornamental grasses
  • Plant winter- and spring-blooming bulbs
  • Rake lawn to remove debris
  • Sow seeds for frost-tolerant perennials
  • Protect tender plants from frost

October

  • Try using violas this season for stupendous color!
  • Use Hi
  • Yield blood & bone meal to feed flowers and bulbs.
  • Create a stunning fall display with locally grown pumpkins and mums!
  • Cover perennial, vegetable, bulb, and strawberry beds for winter
  • Plant winter- and spring-blooming bulbs
  • Rake lawn to remove debris
  • Sow seeds for frost-tolerant perennials
  • Protect tender plants from frost

November

  • Divide perennials.
  • Purchase Corona rakes and gardening tools for fall clean up chores!
  • Cover perennial, vegetable, bulb, and strawberry beds for winter
  • Plant winter- and spring-blooming bulbs
  • Rake lawn to remove debris
  • Protect roses for the winter
  • Prune fall- and winter-flowering shrubs during or just after bloom
  • Prune hardy deciduous and evergreen shrubs and vines
  • Protect tender plants from frost

December

  • Purchase a Living Christmas tree this year and enjoy it for years to come!
  • Stuff Stockings with River Valley gift cards, Botanical Interest seeds, and ergonomic tools by Natural Radius Grip.
  • Use topiary boxwoods for an outdoor Christmas tree on a porch or deck.
  • Apply dormant spray to ornamental trees
  • Water living Christmas trees
  • Sow frost-tolerant perennials
  • Prune winter-flowering shrubs during or just after bloom
  • Prune hardy deciduous and evergreen trees
  • Protect tender plants from frost